Tesla Solar Roof: Cost Estimate with Powerwall 2 and Electricity Costs Included



There aren’t many details yet about the Tesla Solar Roof product but Elon Musk has given us some clues. In this video, I break down what he said and what the potential costs may be for the newTesla Solar Roof including the Powerwall 2 and the cost of electricity.

Tesla Solar Roof Cost Estimator

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What is the Tesla Solar Roof? (src: tesla.com)

The sun provides more than enough energy in just one hour to supply our planet’s energy needs for an entire year. Your home can capture this free, abundant energy source through rooftop solar tiles, turning sunlight into electricity for immediate use or storage in a Powerwall battery.

History of the Tesla Solar Roof (src: wikipedia)

In the August 2016 earnings call, Elon Musk preannounced that Solar City would be introducing a new product where the photovoltaic electrical energy generating devices and system would make up an entire roof surface, rather than merely be the mounting of solar panels on an existing roof, stating “It’s not a thing on a roof. It is the roof,”[53] as solar energy systems have generally been designed and installed during the early decades of terrestrial solar power.[54] Assorted styles of solar roof tiles, made of glass, were unveiled at Universal Studios’ Colonial Street backlot street set in late October 2016. Also unveiled was the Tesla Powerwall 2, a home battery product designed to store surplus power, either from the tiles or from the grid.[55] Consumer Reports compared the estimated economy of solar roofs to traditional roofing.[56][57]

What is a Tesla Powerwall? (src: wikipedia)

The Powerwall and Powerpack are rechargeable lithium-ion battery stationary energy storage products manufactured by Tesla Motors. The Powerwall is intended for home use and stores electricity for solar self-consumption, time of use load shifting, backup power, and off-the-grid use.[1] The larger Powerpack is intended for commercial or electric utility grid use and can be used for peak shaving, load shifting, backup power, demand response, microgrids, renewable power integration, frequency regulation, and voltage control.

Announced in 2015, with a pilot demonstration of 500 units built and installed during 2015, production of the product was initially at the Tesla Fremont factory before being moved to the under construction Gigafactory 1 in Nevada.[2] The second generation of both products were announced in October 2016.

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